09/25/2019

Prepare for CDT 2020 dental code changes


CDA encourages dentists to prepare for CDT 2020 dental code additions, revisions and deletions that go into effect Jan. 1, 2020. The new year will bring 37 new and five revised codes, plus six deleted codes.

While dental plans are required to recognize current CDT codes, it is important to keep in mind that they are not required to pay for or provide benefits for the new or revised codes. Dentists should review each dental plan’s payment and processing guidelines to determine whether benefits will be payable. Typically, plans will start sending updates about policy changes for the new year in late October and early November.

New CDT 2020 procedure codes:

  1. D0419 – assessment of salivary flow by measurement
  2. D1551 – re-cement or re-bond bilateral space maintainer – maxillary
  3. D1552 – re-cement or re-bond bilateral space maintainer – mandibular
  4. D1553 – re-cement or re-bond unilateral space maintainer – per quadrant
  5. D1556 – removal of fixed unilateral space maintainer – per quadrant
  6. D1557 – removal of fixed bilateral space maintainer – maxillary
  7. D1558 – removal of fixed bilateral space maintainer – mandibular
  8. D2753 – crown - porcelain fused to titanium and titanium alloys
  9. D5284 – removable unilateral partial denture – one piece flexible base (including clasps and teeth) – per quadrant
  10. D5286 – removable unilateral partial denture – one piece resin (including clasps and teeth) – per quadrant
  11. D6082 – implant supported crown – porcelain fused to predominantly base alloys
  12. D6083 – implant supported crown – porcelain fused to noble alloys
  13. D6084 – implant supported crown – porcelain fused to titanium and titanium alloys
  14. D6086 – implant supported crown – predominantly base alloys
  15. D6087 – implant supported crown – noble alloys
  16. D6088 – implant supported crown – titanium and titanium alloys
  17. D6097 – abutment supported crown – porcelain fused to titanium and titanium alloys
  18. D6098 – implant supported retainer – porcelain fused to predominantly base alloys
  19. D6099 – implant supported retainer for FPD – porcelain fused to noble alloys
  20. D6120 – implant supported retainer – porcelain fused to titanium and titanium alloys
  21. D6121 – implant supported retainer for metal FPD – predominantly base alloys
  22. D6122 – implant supported retainer for metal FPD – noble alloys
  23. D6123 – implant supported retainer for metal FPD – titanium and titanium alloys
  24. D6195 – abutment supported retainer – porcelain fused to titanium and titanium alloys
  25. D6243 – pontic – porcelain fused to titanium and titanium alloys
  26. D6753 – retainer crown – porcelain fused to titanium and titanium alloys
  27. D6784 – retainer crown ¾ – titanium and titanium alloys
  28. D7922 – placement of intra-socket biological dressing to aid in hemostasis or clot stabilization, per site
  29. D8696 – repair of orthodontic appliance – maxillary
  30. D8697 – repair of orthodontic appliance – mandibular
  31. D8698 – re-cement or re-bond fixed retainer – maxillary
  32. D8699 – re-cement or re-bond fixed retainer – mandibular
  33. D8701 – repair of fixed retainer, includes reattachment – maxillary
  34. D8702 – repair of fixed retainer, includes reattachment – mandibular
  35. D8703 – replacement of lost or broken retainer – maxillary
  36. D8704 – replacement of lost or broken retainer – mandibular
  37. D9997 – dental case management – patients with special health care needs

CDT code revisions:

  1. D1510 space maintainer – fixed, unilateral – per quadrant. Excludes a distal shoe space maintainer.
  2. D1520 space maintainer – removable, – unilateral – per quadrant
  3. D1575 distal shoe space maintainer – fixed – unilateral – per quadrant fabrication and delivery of fixed appliance extending subgingivally and distally to guide the eruption of the first permanent molar. Does not include ongoing follow-up or adjustments, or replacement appliances, once the tooth has erupted.

In addition, there will be periodontal category descriptor revisions.

Site:

– If two contiguous teeth have areas of soft tissue recession, each area of recession tooth is a single site.
– Depending on the dimensions of the defect, up to two contiguous edentulous tooth positions may be considered a single site.

CDT code deletions:

  1. D1550 – re-cement or re-bond space maintainer
  2. D1555 – removal of fixed space maintainer
  3. D8691 – repair of orthodontic appliance
  4. D8692 – replacement of lost or broken retainer
  5. D8693 – re-cement or re-bond fixed retainer
  6. D8694 – repair of fixed retainers, includes reattachment

There are also 15 editorial (e.g., syntax spelling) actions that clarify without changing the CDT Code entry’s purpose or scope. CDA encourages all billing dentists to obtain a current copy of the American Dental Association CDT 2020 procedure codes, which are available for purchase through the ADA at adacatalog.org. It is recommended that all dental offices have a current copy to assist with proper claim billing.

Additionally, when coding, dentists must code for the work that was done, not for what is covered under the patient’s benefit plan.

For inquiries about dental code changes, contact the ADA at 312.440.2500 or dentalcode@ada.org.



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