06/29/2017

Minimum wage, paid sick leave increases take effect July 1


A number of local minimum wage increases across California will take effect July 1, 2017. Eligibility rules may vary among the locations listed below. Practice owners should review the individual city ordinances and follow posting requirements to be in compliance. Employers should update practice employee manuals and policies accordingly.

Specifically, the following cities and county will increase their minimum wage July 1:

Emeryville: $15.20 an hour for businesses with 56 or more employees; $14 an hour for businesses with 55 or fewer employees.

City of Los Angeles: $12 an hour for employers with 26 or more employees; $10.50 an hour for employers with 25 or fewer employees.

Los Angeles County (unincorporated areas only): $12 an hour for employers with 26 or more employees; $10.50 an hour for employers with 25 or fewer employees.

Malibu: $12 an hour for employers with 26 or more employees; $10.50 an hour for employers with 25 or fewer employees.

Milpitas: $11 an hour

Pasadena: $12 an hour for employers with 26 or more employees; $10.50 an hour for employers with 25 or fewer employees.

San Francisco: $14 an hour.

San Jose: $12 an hour.

San Leandro: $12 an hour

Santa Monica: $12 an hour for employers with 26 or more employees; $10.50 an hour for employers with 25 or fewer employees.

Local leave laws

The City of Los Angeles’ Paid Sick Leave Ordinance now applies to all employers. Employers with 25 or fewer employees begin providing increased accrual benefits (48 hours annually for use/72 hours for total accrual cap) for sick leave benefits July 1, 2017.

San Francisco’s Paid Parental Leave Ordinance was passed with a phased-in implementation. Employers with 35 or more employees must begin complying as of July 1, 2017.

Many of these local ordinances contain notice requirements.

For more information, see the CDA Practice Support resource Minimum Wage and Paid Sick Leave Ordinances by City.



Related Items

As a best practice, all California practice owners or employers should know the applicable wage order for their business and employees along with the regulations contained in it. Dental practices typically fall under Wage Order 4 — specifically, Order No. 4-2001. The California Department of Industrial Relations updated Wage Order 4-2001 to reflect the 2017 and 2018 increases in the state minimum wage and also updated meal and lodging credit amounts.

Many dentists manage risks in areas beyond clinical care. A telling example is the requirement for all employers to post workplace labor law notices, since failure to comply in this area alone can result in substantial fines. To assist members in the business ownership side of practice, CDA prints a full set of required posters every two years. The 2017-18 set is now available for distribution.

The California Supreme Court on Dec. 22 issued an important decision in a case (Augustus v. ABM) involving the security guard industry. In its simplest form, the ruling stated that “… state law prohibits on-duty and on-call rest periods. During required rest periods, employers must relieve their employees of all duties and relinquish any control over how employees spend their break time.”

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