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Regulatory Compliance

All California dentists with sedation, anesthesia permits expiring in 2022 must renew by Dec. 31 to practice under existing permit terms

The Dental Board of California today notified licensees with general anesthesia, conscious sedation and oral conscious sedation for minors permits expiring in 2022 that they “must renew their permits by December 31, 2021, in order to continue to practice under the existing terms of the permits beyond the scheduled 2022 expiration date."

Before recording, protect private patient information

Surveillance cameras in dental offices are becoming more and more common. The driving force behind them is typically security, as cameras can aid in loss control, deter theft and discourage other criminal activity. But cameras are not without their drawbacks. Prior to hitting the record button, practice owners should be aware of the laws and regulations surrounding their use. While laws vary from state to state, there are some basic guidelines.

California’s new COVID-19 paid sick leave law expands eligibility for covered employers, employees

New federal and state paid sick leave laws related to COVID-19 that were recently passed affect small businesses, including some dental practices. Here’s what practice owners need to know about national and statewide paid sick leave laws and how they apply to their dental office.

Dental board's sunset review bill includes clarifications on licensure

The Dental Board of California is undergoing its sunset review in the state Legislature. In Assembly Bill 1519, authored by the Assembly Business and Professions Committee, the dental board provides a status update to the Legislature and identifies opportunities for improvement. CDA has particular interest in three areas of the dental board’s sunset review bill, including clarifying how an applicant can obtain a new license after their initial license has expired.

Dental practice pays $10K to settle disclosures of patients' PHI on social media

A private dental practice in Dallas, Texas, has agreed to pay $10,000 to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ Office for Civil Rights to settle potential violations of the HIPAA privacy rule. The HHS reported that the OCR completed its investigation of a complaint by a patient who alleged that the practice disclosed on social media the patient’s last name and the details of the patient’s health condition.

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