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Sugar-Sweetened Beverages (SSBs)

August 06, 2019 1640

CDA and the California Medical Association are leading efforts to reduce SSB consumption and have launched a campaign — Soda’s Sticky Business— highlighting the industry’s deceptive marketing tactics targeting children and low-income and minority communities.

CDA and the California Medical Association are leading efforts to reduce SSB consumption and have launched a campaign — Soda’s Sticky Business — highlighting the industry’s deceptive marketing tactics targeting children and low-income and minority communities. CDA and CMA introduced three bills in 2019 that would reduce the consumption of sugary beverages including soda, energy drinks, sugar-added juices and sports drinks:

  • AB 764 (Bonta) will limit promotional pricing incentives used by the beverage industry to heavily subsidize discounts on SSBs.
  • AB 765 (Wicks), the Healthy Checkout Aisles for Healthy Families Act, will prohibit placement of SSBs near the check-out counter at supermarkets, large grocery stores and warehouse clubs.
  • AB 766 (Chiu) will ban the sale of unsealed beverages larger than 16 ounces at food-service establishments.

SSBs are the single largest source of added sugar in the American diet and a primary cause of various health conditions including tooth decay, which affects more than two-thirds of California children (making it the most common chronic childhood disease). The frequency of consumption along with the combination of high levels of sugar and acid make these beverages uniquely damaging to teeth and overall health. Sport, energy and soft drinks are leading to unprecedented levels of decay and loss of tooth enamel for a new generation of youths and young adults. The overconsumption of sugary, acidic drinks is reversing more than 50 years of public health gains realized through preventive measures such as fluoridated water and dental sealants. CDA also supports AB 138 (Bloom), which creates a tax on the distribution of SSBs, and SB 347 (Monning), which will require a warning label on sugary drinks to help educate consumers as they make their purchasing decisions. All of these pieces of legislation are now two-year bills and are up for reconsideration in 2020.